Human Development Indexes

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The HDI is the ambitious attempt to analyze and compare socioeconomic development. The HDI measures all countries on a scale of 0 to 1 with 0 being the lowest level of development and 1 being the highest. Measuring the HDI brings together three things (in equal parts): life expectancy, education, and standard of living. HDI is HDI=1/3(income index)+1/3(life expectancy index)+1/3(education index).Life expectancy is measured by expected life at a person's time of birth. Education is measured using adult literacy and years of schooling. Standard of living is measured using real per capita GDP adjusted for each countries PPP. [1] HDI proves that measuring inequality takes much more than simply looking at financial statistics. Development entails broad human development, not simply higher income. HDI also allows different countries to be compared, each component of the total HDI can be broken down and compared accordingly.

HDI is highly correlated with per capita income because nations with higher incomes can invest more in health and education. Investing in health and education improves human capital. Human capital is directly correlated with productivity, as human capital increases productivity increases as well.

A drawback of this measurement style is that quality of education is not taken into account. Just because a child goes to school for 6 years does not mean he is ready for secondary school. Many teachers in developing countries are known to have high rates of absenteeism leaving the children who go to school with no one to teach them. Another problem with measuring the education in the HDI, is that enrollment is the measurement. Therefore, dropouts are not taken into account, and in many poor ares or developing nations dropout rates are high. [2]

2011 Report

The 2011 Human Development Report was released on 2 November 2011, and calculated HDI values based on estimates for 2011. Below is the list of the "Very High Human Development" countries (equal to the top quartile) [3]

Norway - 0.943 
Australia - 0.929 
Netherlands - 0.910 
United States - 0.910 
New Zealand - 0.908 
Canada - 0.908 
Ireland - 0.908 
Liechtenstein - 0.905 
Germany - 0.905 
Sweden - 0.904 
Switzerland - 0.903 
Japan - 0.901 
Hong Kong - 0.898
Iceland - 0.898 
South Korea - 0.897 
Denmark - 0.895 
Israel - 0.888 
Belgium - 0.886
Austria - 0.885
France - 0.884 
Slovenia - 0.884 
Finland - 0.882
Spain - 0.878 
Italy - 0.874 
Luxembourg - 0.867 
Singapore - 0.866 
Czech Republic - 0.865
United Kingdom - 0.863 
Greece - 0.861 
United Arab Emirates - 0.846 
Cyprus - 0.840 
Andorra - 0.838
Brunei - 0.838 
Estonia - 0.835 
Slovakia - 0.834 
Malta - 0.832 
Qatar - 0.831 
Hungary - 0.816 
Poland - 0.813 
Lithuania - 0.810 
Portugal - 0.809 
Bahrain - 0.806 
Latvia - 0.805 
Chile - 0.805 
Argentina - 0.797 
Croatia - 0.796 
Barbados - 0.793

2010 Report

The 2010 Human Development Report by the United Nations Development Program was released on November 4, 2010, and calculates HDI values based on estimates for 2010. Below is the list of the "Very High Human Development" countries:[4]

Norway - 0.938 
Australia - 0.937 
New Zealand - 0.907 
United States - 0.902
Ireland - 0.895 
Liechtenstein - 0.891 
Netherlands - 0.890 
Canada - 0.888 
Sweden - 0.885 
Germany - 0.885 
Japan - 0.884 
South Korea - 0.877 
Switzerland - 0.874 
France - 0.872 
Israel - 0.872 
Finland - 0.871 
Iceland - 0.869 
Belgium - 0.867 
Denmark - 0.866 
Spain - 0.863 
Hong Kong - 0.862 
Greece - 0.855 
Italy - 0.854 
Luxembourg - 0.852 
Austria - 0.851 
United Kingdom - 0.849 
Singapore - 0.846
Czech Republic - 0.841 
Slovenia - 0.828
Andorra - 0.824 
Slovakia - 0.818 
United Arab Emirates - 0.815 
Malta - 0.815 
Estonia - 0.812 
Cyprus - 0.810 
Hungary - 0.805 
Brunei - 0.805 
Qatar - 0.803 
Bahrain - 0.801 
Portugal - 0.795 
Poland - 0.795 
Barbados - 0.788 

2009 Report

The 2009 Human Development Report by UNDP was released on October 5, 2009, and covers the period up to 2007. It was titled "Overcoming barriers: Human mobility and development". The top countries by HDI were grouped in a new category called "Very High Human Development". The report refers to these countries as developed countries.[16] They are: [5]

Norway - 0.971 
Australia - 0.970 
Iceland - 0.969
Canada - 0.966 
Ireland - 0.965 
Netherlands - 0.964 
Sweden - 0.963 
France - 0.961 
Switzerland - 0.960 
Japan - 0.960 
Luxembourg - 0.960 
Finland - 0.959 
United States - 0.956 
Austria - 0.955 
Spain - 0.955 
Denmark - 0.955 
Belgium - 0.953 
Italy - 0.951 
Liechtenstein - 0.951 
New Zealand - 0.950 
United Kingdom - 0.947 
Germany - 0.947 
Singapore - 0.944 
Hong Kong - 0.944 
Greece - 0.942 
South Korea - 0.937 
Israel - 0.935 
Andorra - 0.934 
Slovenia - 0.929 
Brunei - 0.920 
Kuwait - 0.916 
Cyprus - 0.914 
Qatar - 0.910 
Portuga - 0.909 
United Arab Emirates - 0.903 
Czech Republic - 0.903 
Barbados - 0.903 
Malta - 0.902 
  1. http://hdr.undp.org/en/statistics/hdi/
  2. http://humandevelopmentindex.net/
  3. http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2011_EN_Table1.pdf
  4. http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2010_EN_Table2.pdf
  5. http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2009_EN_Complete.pdf
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